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January 25, 2018

Leading farmworker organizations and advocates for farmworkers in the United States and Mexico today are submitting a petition under the NAFTA labor side agreement challenging the failure of the United States government to comply with its obligations to protect international migrant workers who are hired under the H-2A agricultural guestworker program.  

The petition was submitted to the National Administrative Office in Mexico City for the North American Agreement on Labor Cooperation (NAALC), requesting action by the North American Commission on Labor Cooperation (“Commission”), which the U.S., Mexico and Canada established.

The petition was submitted by Farmworker Justice; the United Farm Workers (UFW); the Farm Labor Organizing Committee, AFL-CIO (FLOC); and Pineros y Campesinos Unidos del Noroeste (PCUN, Oregon’s farmworker union), which are based in the United States, and Proyecto de Derechos Económicos, Sociales y Culturales, A.C (ProDESC), which is based in Mexico.

Principle 11 of the NAALC, on Protection of Migrant Workers, states the parties’ goal of providing migrant workers in one nation’s territory with the same labor law protection that apply to its own nationals.  The Agreement also imposes enforceable obligations on the three nations to provide high labor standards; effective, impartial tribunals; effective remedies to achieve compliance with labor laws; and effective action by each government to enforce workers’ rights.

The principal federal employment law for farmworkers in the United States excludes H-2A agricultural workers from its protections and remedies.  That law is the Migrant and Seasonal Agricultural Worker Protection Act of 1983 (referred to as “AWPA” or “MSPA”).  It was passed to address persistent problems faced by farmworkers and strengthened an earlier law.

The petitioners seek to reduce abuses in the H-2A program, which recently has been expanding rapidly, to over 200,000 agricultural guestworkers in 2017, mostly from Mexico.  Abuses in the H-2A program have been reported by many sources over many years, including in the Farmworker Justice report, “No Way to Treat a Guest,” and a series of articles in Buzzfeed.   

The AWPA establishes obligations on farm operators and other agricultural businesses, including farm labor contractors. The AWPA contains significant protections regarding recruitment, hiring, employment, payment of wages, transportation, and housing of migrant farmworkers.  Importantly, the AWPA authorizes victimized workers to file a lawsuit in U.S. federal courts to enforce its protections.  It creates several remedies to compensate workers, stop ongoing violations, and deter future violations, including monetary damages, special “statutory damages” and injunctive relief.  

The exclusion of H-2A visa workers from the AWPA deprives them of labor protections, remedies, and access to federal courts, all of which have been deemed important and effective to protect migrant workers in the United States. Although the law and regulations of the H-2A program require certain protections for U.S. and foreign workers at H-2A program employers, the AWPA provides different and additional protections and remedies for U.S. migrant workers.  H-2A guestworkers seeking to enforce their employment contracts are relegated to state courts and often to inferior remedies under state contract laws.

H-2A guestworkers, arguably among the migrant workers most in need of protection due to their vulnerability, should not be excluded from AWPA’s protections and remedies.    

The petition, formally known as a “public communication,” requests commencement of proceedings under the Labor Side Agreement, formally known as the North American Agreement on Labor Cooperation (NAALC), to address the violations of the NAALC and obtain all appropriate remedies.  The petition seeks agreement among the U.S., Mexico and Canada, that the protections and remedies in the Migrant and Seasonal Agricultural Worker Protection Act, or their equivalent, will be extended to migrant workers employed in the United States under the H-2A temporary foreign agricultural worker program.

Contact information:

 

Bruce Goldstein

President, Farmworker Justice

Washington, D.C. 20036

202-800-2521

[email protected]

www.farmworkerjustice.org

 

Leydy Rangel

Communications Specialist

United Farm Workers Foundation

California

[email protected] / (760) 899-4604

(bilingual)

 

Elena Villafuerte

Responsable del Programa de Análisis e Incidencia

Proyecto de Derechos Económicos, Sociales y Culturales (ProDESC)

(5255) 52122229/ 52122230- 758608840/ 75860885

[email protected]

Calle Zamora 169-A Condesa, México D.F.

Facebook /ProDESC.AC

Twitter: @ProDESC

www.prodesc.org.mx

(bilingual)

January 11, 2018

Farmworker Justice Statement on Rep. Goodlatte’s Anti-Immigrant Bill

Yesterday, Rep. Bob Goodlatte, Chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, and Representatives McCaul, Labrador and McSally, released a hard-line anti-immigration proposal entitled the “Securing America’s Future Act.”  Farmworker Justice opposes this multi-faceted proposal, which incorporates Goodlatte’s anti-worker, anti-immigrant Agricultural Guestworker Act. The bill combines many of the worst elements of anti-immigrant policies, including building a costly border wall, increasing arrests and deportations of undocumented immigrants, attacking sanctuary cities, and eliminating existing opportunities for family reunification as well as the diversity visa program. Although it purports to offer relief to Dreamers, the bill only offers a three-year, temporary legal status, without any permanent solution or path to citizenship.

The bill would also require employers to use E-verify, which would exacerbate discrimination against Latinos and foreign-born workers, who make up the majority of the farm labor source. If enacted, the agricultural guestworker provisions in the bill would replace the current H-2A agricultural guestworker program with a devastating new program, the H-2C program. The H-2C program would expand employer access to potentially millions of vulnerable new “guestworkers,” while slashing worker protections for hundreds of thousands of U.S. farmworkers, leading to job losses, lower wages and exploitation. Instead of providing experienced undocumented farmworkers with a path to immigration status and citizenship, the only option this bill provides is for those workers to self-deport with limited options to return as subjugated contract laborers under the new H-2C program.

Rep. Goodlatte, a long-time immigration restrictionist, is trying to push his extreme anti-immigrant agenda at a moment of bipartisan negotiations between legislators and the White House to reach a much-needed solution for Dreamers. Farmworker Justice President Bruce Goldstein stated: “Congress must reject the Goodlatte bill because it is anti-immigrant, anti-worker, cruel, impractical, costly and harmful to our food and agriculture systems.  Congress must provide a solution now for Dreamers, many of whom are farmworkers and from farmworker families. We must continue in the longer term to reform our broken immigration system through policies that respect our history as a nation of immigrants and our democratic and economic freedoms.”

January 09, 2018

Report by Trump Administration Task Force on Agriculture and Rural Prosperity Fails Farmworkers, their Families and their Communities

On January 8, Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue, Chair of the inter-agency Task Force on Agriculture and Rural Prosperity, established by President Trump, publicly released its Report to the President of the United States, which is dated October 21, 2017.

The 42-page report is fundamentally flawed because it ignores the interests and needs of farmworkers and their family members. While it acknowledges the existence of farmworkers, it treats them largely as economic inputs utilized by farmers rather than as living, breathing human beings who are vital to the economy and rural communities.

The report makes no mention of the word immigration despite it being of vital significance to the future of agriculture and rural communities.  The Task Force states that farmers are having difficulty finding workers who are citizens or lawful permanent residents to fill their jobs, and acknowledges that undocumented workers are being hired.  It does not, however, state the reality that at least one-half (and probably much more) of the farm labor force is undocumented.  In a major failing, the report does not recommend immigration reform that would grant undocumented workers a chance for immigration status and a path to citizenship.

The report ignores the relationship between the growers’ difficulty attracting and retaining adequate numbers of workers and the fact that agricultural work in the U.S. is characterized by low wages and lack of fringe benefits, high rates of injuries and workplace abuses, and discrimination in labor laws that deprives farmworkers of many protections applicable to most other workers. The report does not discuss the need to remedy and prevent the rampant violations of labor protections in agriculture that harm farmworkers as well as law-abiding employers.

The report suggests that the Administration will be making policy and regulatory changes to the H-2A agricultural guestworker program in response to complaints that were “well communicated by farmers.”  The report ignores the many well-documented abuses experienced by farmworkers under the H-2A program.  Nor does the report suggest why agricultural workers should be forced into a guestworker status with no path to democratic or economic freedoms applicable to immigrants and citizens.

Even when discussing the needs of rural communities in order to improve quality of life – such as addressing gaps in infrastructure, housing, access to health care and internet connectivity – the report fails to identify the particular challenges faced by farmworkers.  Instead the report focuses on the needs of businesses and farm owners or other rural residents.

The report briefly mentions the need for science-based regulations to ensure the health of consumers of food, but there is no mention of confronting pesticides and other occupational hazards that disproportionately kill and injure farmworkers.

The Task Force also lost an opportunity to encourage positive trends in agriculture by neglecting to discuss corporate social responsibility in the food supply chain.  Government should encourage companies that are responding to consumers’ demands for assurances that food production occurs responsibly with regard to the treatment of farmworkers in the fields.

Any report on the future of agriculture and rural prosperity should recognize the contributions and needs of the nation’s approximately 2.5 million farmworkers and their family members. The Task Force does not appear to have taken advantage of the informed views of many farmworkers and their representatives as well as numerous reports, books and studies about the needs of this nation’s farmworkers, families and communities.  This report, despite raising some valid concerns and offering some helpful recommendations about agriculture and rural communities, has failed the President and the public.

        Bruce Goldstein

        President, Farmworker Justice

        January 9, 2018

Featured Blog

February 09, 2018

Farmworker Justice Update: 02/07/18

H-2A Farmworkers File Lawsuit on Abusive Labor Practices on Blueberry Farm

On January 25, 2018, Columbia Legal Services, in conjunction with law firm Schroeter Goldmark & Bender, filed a class action lawsuit on behalf of H-2A farmworkers against Sarbanand Farms, its parent company Munger Bros., and labor contractor CSI Visa Processing. Munger is the largest producer of fresh blueberries in the world, with more than 3,000 acres in Washington, Oregon, California, British Columbia and Mexico. The lawsuit alleges that the H-2A farmworkers, who worked on Sarbanand Farms in Sumas, Washington, were subject to intimidation, threats and labor violations, and were retaliated against after they went on strike. As described in a recent Mother Jones article, the workers were told to keep picking unless they were on their death bed. Tragically, one of the farmworkers, Honesto Silva, died in August 2017 after complications from diabetes, which some workers believed may have been exacerbated by the working conditions. Sarbanand Farms currently faces nearly $150,000 in fines from the Washington State Department of Labor related to late or missed employee breaks and meal periods. Over 600 farmworkers could potentially be members of the class action.

Congress Reportedly Considering Budget Agreement without Solution for DACA

Congress is facing yet another self-imposed deadline as the current short-term budget resolution is set to expire on February 8. The Senate has reportedly reached a compromise on a two-year budget agreement which would increase budget caps, military spending and disaster aid. It would also extend funding for community health centers for two years and the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) for an additional four years. However, the deal does not provide a solution for immigrant youth, and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) has stated that she will not vote for the agreement unless she is guaranteed a vote on immigration legislation in the House.

Senator Lindsey Graham (R-SC) had earlier mentioned the possibility of provisionally extending DREAMers’ status for a one-year period.  Although the official end date for the DACA program is March 5, 2018, many DACA recipients have already lost their status. The White House stated on February 6 that it will not extend the March 5 deadline. Pursuant to a court decision earlier this year, DACA recipients are currently able to apply to renew their status; however litigation in the case is ongoing. Earlier this week, Senators John McCain (R-AZ) and Chris Coons (D-DE) introduced the “Uniting and Securing America (USA) Act” a bi-partisan immigration proposal that is the companion to a bill previously introduced by Representatives Hurd (R-TX) and Aguilar (D-CA) in the House. The bill is relatively narrow in scope and provides a pathway to citizenship for DREAMers while at the same time increasing border security.

Congress should focus now on a bill that provides a real solution for DREAMers.  It should reject the nativist policy wish list that President Trump insists should be combined with any DACA bill.

Human Cost of Deporting Undocumented Farmworkers Affects a Federal Judge

Macario Gilberto Reyes-Herrera is a farmworker with three children who has worked New York’s farms for almost 27 years.  Like many farmworkers, he is undocumented.  He has been detained and charged with violating our immigration laws, to which he plead guilty.  The federal district court judge in Rochester, Charles Siragusa, reportedly “praised Reyes-Herrera for living the ‘American Dream’ and then added, ‘I hope, by some miracle, you can be allowed to stay.’”  This is just one of thousands of stories that demonstrate the need for immigration reform that recognizes the contributions of farmworkers, the legitimate needs of farmers, and the benefits of immigrants to the nation.

ICE Issues Directive Regarding Immigration Enforcement in Courthouses

On January 31, 2018, Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) published a directive formalizing its policies for enforcement activities in courthouses. The directive lays out ICE’s internal guidelines for this type of enforcement, which many immigration activists have noted to be on the rise in the past year. The directive was announced amidst complaints from legal practitioners and advocates that increased immigration enforcement has led some immigrants to forgo pursuing civil and criminal cases, including serving as witnesses. It states that immigration agents should try to avoid enforcement actions in public areas of the courthouse, as well as in non-criminal courtrooms. It also establishes that family members and friends accompanying a targeted individual and those serving as witnesses should not be targeted absent special circumstances. In related FAQs, ICE reiterated its policy of avoiding enforcement actions at sensitive locations, which does not include courthouses but does include schools, hospitals and places of worship, while at the same time noting that there are exceptions to this policy for border areas. For more information on ICE’s courthouse policy, please see the full document and/or “Frequently Asked Questions.”

Update on Farmworker Health and Safety

Young Children Suffer Severe Injuries from Farm Work   

A recent New York Times article highlights the dangerous and sometimes fatal working conditions faced by children on small family farms. Thousands of children and teenagers are injured and approximately 100 are killed each year while doing farm work. However, the number of injuries and fatalities is likely higher, as there are few standards on how to report such incidents. Some small farm owners say that financial pressures lead them to utilize young family members in lieu of hiring paid employees, while many say that growing up working on a farm is a part of rural life and teaches children valuable lessons. There are questions about the appropriateness of certain tasks for children, however, as some of these deaths resulted from very young children operating heavy motorized equipment.  The agricultural sector has few child labor protections, particularly when it comes to children employed on their own family’s farm.

Sexual Harassment on Farms Is an Epidemic

A recent Atlantic article weaves together diverse stories and studies regarding sexual harassment against farmworker women. As detailed in the article, workers on temporary visas controlled by their employers and those without immigration documents are extremely vulnerable to exploitation. Low-wage workers, who are disproportionally women of color, are extremely susceptible to harassment, but this harassment often receives less attention. In many cases, the harassment is followed by retaliation if the worker rejects the sexual advances or tries to report the abuse.

Farmworker Justice to Honor Leading Advocates for Women

The Farmworker Justice Los Angeles Award Reception on March 20 will include honors for Suguet Lopez and Olga Talamante.  Ms. Lopez is Executive Director of Lideres Campesinas de California (Farmworker Women Leaders of California) and is Secretary of the Board of Alianza Nacional de Campesinas (National Alliance of Farmworker Women).  She will receive our Dolores Huerta award.  Ms. Talamante served for many years as the Executive Director of the Chicana/Latina Foundation in California and was a farmworker as a child who worked the fields in Gilroy, California with her parents who brought her from Mexico.  Information about the event and opportunities to cosponsor and purchase tickets is available on our website special events page.

January 29, 2018

Farmworker Justice Update: 01/25/18


Congress Passes another Short-Term Funding Bill without Relief for Dreamers  

On January 22, Congress passed another short-term funding bill, ending a government shutdown that began when the previous short-term spending bill expired on January 19. The current bill will expire on February 8 and does not include any relief for Dreamers. Although there is bipartisan agreement that a DACA solution is needed, recent immigration negotiations have expanded to include issues well beyond DACA. It is unclear if or when a bi-partisan compromise may be reached.  The White House announced yesterday that it would be unveiling its own immigration “legislative framework” on Monday. In the meantime, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) is receiving DACA renewal applications, in compliance with a court order issued earlier this month, which the Department of Justice has appealed.  


Anti-Immigrant Republicans Calling for Vote on Goodlatte Immigration Bill
As mentioned in our previous update, Rep. Bob Goodlatte recently introduced a hard-line immigration bill, the Securing America’s Future Act (H.R. 4760), which includes his Agricultural Guestworker Act (AGA), among many other anti-immigrant and anti-worker provisions. Amidst continued discussions regarding immigration, members of the right-wing House Freedom Caucus are calling for a vote on Rep. Goodlatte’s bill. However, many Democrats, as well as some moderate Republicans, have stated that they will not support the bill, so it may not pass out of the House of Representatives. Additionally, it is very unlikely to pass in the Senate. Some agricultural employer associations who initially supported the AGA have also expressed opposition to the Securing America’s Future Act and note that the AGA “fails to provide adequate assurances for [their] current and future workforce needs.”  Farmworker Justice will continue to monitor and strongly oppose Rep. Goodlatte’s bill.


Haitians Ineligible for H-2 Guestworker Visas
The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) recently announced that it will no longer accept H-2A and H-2B workers from Haiti, citing “extremely high rates of refusal,” “high levels of fraud and abuse” and “a high rate of overstaying the terms of their H–2 admission.” The H-2A program’s fundamental flaws, including restricting guestworkers to one employer and widespread abuses of workers, contribute to guestworkers leaving their jobs without authorization to find other employment. This decision inappropriately excludes an entire nation’s citizens for the alleged conduct of a few individuals without addressing the H-2A program’s flaws and abusive treatment of workers. Some view the decision as another blow to the Haitian community following the Administration’s decision to rescind Temporary Protected Status (TPS) for Haiti last year, as well as a string of racially-charged comments against Haitians allegedly made by President Trump. On January 24, the NAACP Legal Defense Fund filed a lawsuit  challenging the Administration’s rescission of TPS for Haitians.  


Leading Farmworker Organizations and Advocates in the U.S. and Mexico File Challenge under NAFTA Labor Side Agreement for U.S. Government Denial of Equal Rights to H-2A Agricultural Guestworkers

Today, Farmworker Justice, FLOC, PCUN, UFW and ProDESC are filing a petition challenging the discriminatory exclusion of H-2A agricultural guestworkers from protections in the principal federal employment law for migrant farmworkers (the Migrant and Seasonal Agricultural Worker Protection Act). The petition calls on the US, Mexico and Canada to remedy this violation of the NAFTA labor side agreement. You can find more details about the petition here.


New York Supreme Court Dismisses Lawsuit Seeking Farmworkers’ Right to Organize
A New York state court recently dismissed a lawsuit seeking to protect farmworkers’ rights to unionize. The lawsuit, brought by the New York Civil Liberties Union (NYCLU), the Workers’ Center of Central New York, and the Worker Justice Center of New York, challenged an 80-year old state law that excludes farmworkers from basic labor protections. Although the state of New York declined to defend the case, the Farm Bureau intervened against the worker advocates, who plan to appeal the ruling.  


Update on Farmworker Health and Safety


Immigration Policies Impacting Access to Health Care Services
A recent Associated Press article published in many news outlets, including the Washington Post, details how immigration policies are impacting access to health care services. The article describes what many of us have already seen or heard in our own communities - fewer Latinos are enrolling in health insurance, and often are forgoing care altogether due to fear of immigration enforcement. It is important to reiterate that information provided in health insurance applications is not shared with ICE and will not be used for immigration enforcement purposes.


CHIP Funding Extended by Latest Spending Bill, but Health Center Funding Still Pending
The short-term spending bill passed by Congress on January 22 included a 6-year funding extension for the Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP). CHIP funding had expired on Sept. 30, 2017. Many states were facing depletion of their CHIP funds, potentially cutting health insurance benefits to low-income children and families. However, federally-funded community health centers, whose funding also expired on Sept. 30, have yet to be re-funded. The uncertainty of short-term funding bills has broad repercussions on public health, including exacerbating personnel shortages and hindering long-term research.  


CMS Announces Possible Work Requirements for Medicaid

Earlier this month, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) announced that states could impose a work requirement on Medicaid beneficiaries. A handful of states, including North Carolina, Maine, Arizona and Kentucky, applied to CMS for approval to implement a work requirement. In these states, able-bodied adults will be required to work a certain number of hours per week or be engaged in volunteer, job training, or other activities (including school) to be eligible for Medicaid. The Center on Budget and Policy Priorities has more information about the Medicaid work requirement and its potentially harmful effect on low-income individuals and families.


New York to Continue Medicaid Coverage for DACA Recipients

On January 23, New York Governor Andrew Cuomo announced that the state will continue to provide Medicaid coverage to DACA recipients who lose their status. New York currently has 42,000 DACA recipients. Information on applying for or renewing Medicaid coverage for DACA recipients is available here.
 

January 17, 2018

Farmworker Justice Update: 01/12/18

Administration’s Focus on Agriculture and Rural Issues Ignores Farmworkers

On January 8, U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Secretary Sonny Perdue publicly released a report that had earlier been given to President Trump by the Interagency Task Force on Agriculture and Rural Prosperity. The publication of the report was timed to coincide with President Trump’s recent appearance at the American Farm Bureau Federation conference. The Task Force was created in response to an April 2017 Executive Order, with the objective of developing proposals for revitalizing rural America. The report is fundamentally flawed however, as it ignores the interests and needs of farmworkers and their families. Though it notes the agricultural sector’s reliance on immigrant labor, it does not address the need for a path to citizenship for agricultural workers, instead stating that the Administration may pursue regulatory reforms to the H-2A agricultural visa program. Farmworker Justice issued a statement regarding the report.

Agricultural Employers Increasingly Turning to Guestworkers for Labor

Though the President notably did not mention agricultural labor during his speech at the American Farm Bureau Federation conference in Tennessee, he did discuss the issue informally with some of the conference participants. As noted in a recent Los Angeles Times article, use of the H-2A agricultural guestworker program has continued to increase exponentially. Many employers are lobbying for changes to the program and/or the creation of a new guestworker program to strip away labor protections and reduce government oversight.

Goodlatte’s New Immigration Proposal Includes Agricultural Guestworker Bill

On January 10, Rep. Bob Goodlatte, Chair of the House Judiciary Committee, along with Representatives McCaul, Labrador and McSally, released a hard-line anti-immigration proposal entitled the “Securing America’s Future Act.”  The bill incorporates the provisions of Rep. Goodlatte’s anti-immigrant, anti-worker Agricultural Guestworker Act (AGA), which he introduced in October 2017. As noted by Farmworker Justice’s Adrienne DerVartanian in an interview in Civil Eats, the AGA “would create a temporary workforce with no ability to become legal immigrants, who are completely dependent on their employers, and who have extremely minimal protection.” We previously summarized the AGA’s proposal for a terribly exploitative new H-2C agricultural guestworker program.

Rep. Goodlatte’s proposal also includes other anti-immigrant policies, including building a costly border wall, increasing arrests and deportations of immigrants, attacking sanctuary cities, and eliminating existing opportunities for family reunification as well as the diversity visa program. With this proposal, Rep. Goodlatte, a long-time immigration restrictionist, is trying to push his extreme anti-immigrant agenda and obstruct a much-needed solution for Dreamers. Farmworker Justice’s statement opposing Rep. Goodlattes’s Securing America’s Future Act is available here.

Dreamers’ Fate Continues to Hang in the Balance amidst Congressional Negotiations

On January 9, President Trump met with multiple Congressional leaders from both parties to discuss a possible solution to his rescission of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. Unfortunately, the meeting did not provide clarity on what a potential DACA compromise might be, or when it might be reached. Two days later, Congressional leaders met with Trump to present a bipartisan compromise on DACA and other issues of concern to the President, who reportedly questioned why the United States should allow immigrants from “shit-hole” countries, including Haiti, as contrasted with Norway. This Vox article provides a summary of these recent immigration negotiations, which are still unfolding.

Congress faces a January 19 deadline to pass a budget resolution, as the current continuing budget resolution, which was approved at the end of last year, expires on that date.  The official rescission of DACA occurs on March 5, when thousands of Dreamers will lose their status, but thousands of Dreamers already have lost their status, with an average of 122 Dreamers losing their status every day.  A clean Dream Act needs to be included as part of any new budget package. Furthermore, the fate of Dreamers should not be exploited in order to enact anti-immigration measures that will negatively impact Dreamers’ own families and communities.

Judge Temporarily Blocks DACA Termination

On January 9, a federal judge issued an order blocking the Trump Administration’s termination of the DACA program. The preliminary injunction was the result of an ongoing lawsuit regarding DACA, Regents v. DHS, and requires the government to continue to accept and process DACA renewal applications. However, by definition, a preliminary injunction is not a permanent solution, and the Administration will likely appeal the decision. Therefore, this litigation development should not distract from the urgency of Congressional action regarding DACA, as this is the only way to provide a permanent solution for Dreamers.

DHS Terminates El Salvador TPS Designation

In yet another devastating blow to our country’s immigrant community, on January 8 the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) announced the termination of the Temporary Protected Status (TPS) designation for El Salvador within an 18 month period (by September 9, 2019). DHS terminated the TPS designations of three other countries (Nicaragua, Haiti and Sudan) last year, and the fate of the TPS designation for Honduras currently remains uncertain. El Salvador has the largest number of TPS recipients, with over 200,000 individuals, as well as over 190,000 U.S. citizen children with at least one parent who is a TPS recipient. This ill-advised decision will have significant adverse social and economic impacts, including in the nation’s capital, where about 40,000 Salvadoran immigrants hold TPS. Farmworker Justice participated in a rally outside the White House to protest the decision. Read Farmworker Justice’s statement on the announcement here.

Update on Farmworker Health and Safety

EPA Seeks to Undo Crucial Worker Protections Regarding Pesticides

As detailed in a recent Huffington Post article, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is preparing to roll back crucial worker protections regarding pesticides. The EPA has announced that it will soon begin a new rule-making process on certain provisions of the Worker Protection Standard (WPS) and Certified Pesticide Applicator (CPA) rules, both of which were recently updated after a decades-long, multi-stakeholder process. The key provisions that are now under threat, and which Farmworker Justice and other worker groups have long advocated for, include a minimum age of 18 for handling pesticides, the right to a representative that can access pesticide exposure information and the establishment of a pesticide application exclusion zone to prevent exposure to bystanders.

The EPA’s decision to reverse course on these worker protections is likely a response to lobbying from the American Farm Bureau, the leading industry group for growers, which has been pushing for a roll back of these protections for years. At its January 9 meeting, the Farm Bureau stated that it was hopeful that these worker protections could be repealed under the current Administration.  These and other protections are necessary to prevent and respond to pesticide exposures among farmworkers and their children because they can cause a range of serious injuries and illnesses, including birth defects, cancer, infertility and neurological deficits.
 

Immigration

Quick access to our dual-language resources about immigration enforcement specifically for farmworkers. Resources include preparedness checklists, FAQs about raids, and Know Your Rights Toolkits.

Immigration is a critically important issue for farmworkers. Learn about current legislation proposals impacting farmworkers.

Learn about the history of guestworker programs, H-2A program for temporary agricultural work, and the H-2B visa program.