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January 25, 2018

Leading farmworker organizations and advocates for farmworkers in the United States and Mexico today are submitting a petition under the NAFTA labor side agreement challenging the failure of the United States government to comply with its obligations to protect international migrant workers who are hired under the H-2A agricultural guestworker program.  

The petition was submitted to the National Administrative Office in Mexico City for the North American Agreement on Labor Cooperation (NAALC), requesting action by the North American Commission on Labor Cooperation (“Commission”), which the U.S., Mexico and Canada established.

The petition was submitted by Farmworker Justice; the United Farm Workers (UFW); the Farm Labor Organizing Committee, AFL-CIO (FLOC); and Pineros y Campesinos Unidos del Noroeste (PCUN, Oregon’s farmworker union), which are based in the United States, and Proyecto de Derechos Económicos, Sociales y Culturales, A.C (ProDESC), which is based in Mexico.

Principle 11 of the NAALC, on Protection of Migrant Workers, states the parties’ goal of providing migrant workers in one nation’s territory with the same labor law protection that apply to its own nationals.  The Agreement also imposes enforceable obligations on the three nations to provide high labor standards; effective, impartial tribunals; effective remedies to achieve compliance with labor laws; and effective action by each government to enforce workers’ rights.

The principal federal employment law for farmworkers in the United States excludes H-2A agricultural workers from its protections and remedies.  That law is the Migrant and Seasonal Agricultural Worker Protection Act of 1983 (referred to as “AWPA” or “MSPA”).  It was passed to address persistent problems faced by farmworkers and strengthened an earlier law.

The petitioners seek to reduce abuses in the H-2A program, which recently has been expanding rapidly, to over 200,000 agricultural guestworkers in 2017, mostly from Mexico.  Abuses in the H-2A program have been reported by many sources over many years, including in the Farmworker Justice report, “No Way to Treat a Guest,” and a series of articles in Buzzfeed.   

The AWPA establishes obligations on farm operators and other agricultural businesses, including farm labor contractors. The AWPA contains significant protections regarding recruitment, hiring, employment, payment of wages, transportation, and housing of migrant farmworkers.  Importantly, the AWPA authorizes victimized workers to file a lawsuit in U.S. federal courts to enforce its protections.  It creates several remedies to compensate workers, stop ongoing violations, and deter future violations, including monetary damages, special “statutory damages” and injunctive relief.  

The exclusion of H-2A visa workers from the AWPA deprives them of labor protections, remedies, and access to federal courts, all of which have been deemed important and effective to protect migrant workers in the United States. Although the law and regulations of the H-2A program require certain protections for U.S. and foreign workers at H-2A program employers, the AWPA provides different and additional protections and remedies for U.S. migrant workers.  H-2A guestworkers seeking to enforce their employment contracts are relegated to state courts and often to inferior remedies under state contract laws.

H-2A guestworkers, arguably among the migrant workers most in need of protection due to their vulnerability, should not be excluded from AWPA’s protections and remedies.    

The petition, formally known as a “public communication,” requests commencement of proceedings under the Labor Side Agreement, formally known as the North American Agreement on Labor Cooperation (NAALC), to address the violations of the NAALC and obtain all appropriate remedies.  The petition seeks agreement among the U.S., Mexico and Canada, that the protections and remedies in the Migrant and Seasonal Agricultural Worker Protection Act, or their equivalent, will be extended to migrant workers employed in the United States under the H-2A temporary foreign agricultural worker program.

Contact information:

 

Bruce Goldstein

President, Farmworker Justice

Washington, D.C. 20036

202-800-2521

[email protected]

www.farmworkerjustice.org

 

Leydy Rangel

Communications Specialist

United Farm Workers Foundation

California

[email protected] / (760) 899-4604

(bilingual)

 

Elena Villafuerte

Responsable del Programa de Análisis e Incidencia

Proyecto de Derechos Económicos, Sociales y Culturales (ProDESC)

(5255) 52122229/ 52122230- 758608840/ 75860885

[email protected]

Calle Zamora 169-A Condesa, México D.F.

Facebook /ProDESC.AC

Twitter: @ProDESC

www.prodesc.org.mx

(bilingual)

January 11, 2018

Farmworker Justice Statement on Rep. Goodlatte’s Anti-Immigrant Bill

Yesterday, Rep. Bob Goodlatte, Chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, and Representatives McCaul, Labrador and McSally, released a hard-line anti-immigration proposal entitled the “Securing America’s Future Act.”  Farmworker Justice opposes this multi-faceted proposal, which incorporates Goodlatte’s anti-worker, anti-immigrant Agricultural Guestworker Act. The bill combines many of the worst elements of anti-immigrant policies, including building a costly border wall, increasing arrests and deportations of undocumented immigrants, attacking sanctuary cities, and eliminating existing opportunities for family reunification as well as the diversity visa program. Although it purports to offer relief to Dreamers, the bill only offers a three-year, temporary legal status, without any permanent solution or path to citizenship.

The bill would also require employers to use E-verify, which would exacerbate discrimination against Latinos and foreign-born workers, who make up the majority of the farm labor source. If enacted, the agricultural guestworker provisions in the bill would replace the current H-2A agricultural guestworker program with a devastating new program, the H-2C program. The H-2C program would expand employer access to potentially millions of vulnerable new “guestworkers,” while slashing worker protections for hundreds of thousands of U.S. farmworkers, leading to job losses, lower wages and exploitation. Instead of providing experienced undocumented farmworkers with a path to immigration status and citizenship, the only option this bill provides is for those workers to self-deport with limited options to return as subjugated contract laborers under the new H-2C program.

Rep. Goodlatte, a long-time immigration restrictionist, is trying to push his extreme anti-immigrant agenda at a moment of bipartisan negotiations between legislators and the White House to reach a much-needed solution for Dreamers. Farmworker Justice President Bruce Goldstein stated: “Congress must reject the Goodlatte bill because it is anti-immigrant, anti-worker, cruel, impractical, costly and harmful to our food and agriculture systems.  Congress must provide a solution now for Dreamers, many of whom are farmworkers and from farmworker families. We must continue in the longer term to reform our broken immigration system through policies that respect our history as a nation of immigrants and our democratic and economic freedoms.”

January 09, 2018

Report by Trump Administration Task Force on Agriculture and Rural Prosperity Fails Farmworkers, their Families and their Communities

On January 8, Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue, Chair of the inter-agency Task Force on Agriculture and Rural Prosperity, established by President Trump, publicly released its Report to the President of the United States, which is dated October 21, 2017.

The 42-page report is fundamentally flawed because it ignores the interests and needs of farmworkers and their family members. While it acknowledges the existence of farmworkers, it treats them largely as economic inputs utilized by farmers rather than as living, breathing human beings who are vital to the economy and rural communities.

The report makes no mention of the word immigration despite it being of vital significance to the future of agriculture and rural communities.  The Task Force states that farmers are having difficulty finding workers who are citizens or lawful permanent residents to fill their jobs, and acknowledges that undocumented workers are being hired.  It does not, however, state the reality that at least one-half (and probably much more) of the farm labor force is undocumented.  In a major failing, the report does not recommend immigration reform that would grant undocumented workers a chance for immigration status and a path to citizenship.

The report ignores the relationship between the growers’ difficulty attracting and retaining adequate numbers of workers and the fact that agricultural work in the U.S. is characterized by low wages and lack of fringe benefits, high rates of injuries and workplace abuses, and discrimination in labor laws that deprives farmworkers of many protections applicable to most other workers. The report does not discuss the need to remedy and prevent the rampant violations of labor protections in agriculture that harm farmworkers as well as law-abiding employers.

The report suggests that the Administration will be making policy and regulatory changes to the H-2A agricultural guestworker program in response to complaints that were “well communicated by farmers.”  The report ignores the many well-documented abuses experienced by farmworkers under the H-2A program.  Nor does the report suggest why agricultural workers should be forced into a guestworker status with no path to democratic or economic freedoms applicable to immigrants and citizens.

Even when discussing the needs of rural communities in order to improve quality of life – such as addressing gaps in infrastructure, housing, access to health care and internet connectivity – the report fails to identify the particular challenges faced by farmworkers.  Instead the report focuses on the needs of businesses and farm owners or other rural residents.

The report briefly mentions the need for science-based regulations to ensure the health of consumers of food, but there is no mention of confronting pesticides and other occupational hazards that disproportionately kill and injure farmworkers.

The Task Force also lost an opportunity to encourage positive trends in agriculture by neglecting to discuss corporate social responsibility in the food supply chain.  Government should encourage companies that are responding to consumers’ demands for assurances that food production occurs responsibly with regard to the treatment of farmworkers in the fields.

Any report on the future of agriculture and rural prosperity should recognize the contributions and needs of the nation’s approximately 2.5 million farmworkers and their family members. The Task Force does not appear to have taken advantage of the informed views of many farmworkers and their representatives as well as numerous reports, books and studies about the needs of this nation’s farmworkers, families and communities.  This report, despite raising some valid concerns and offering some helpful recommendations about agriculture and rural communities, has failed the President and the public.

        Bruce Goldstein

        President, Farmworker Justice

        January 9, 2018

Featured Blog

February 21, 2018

Farmworker Justice Immigration Update – 02/16/18

Results of Senate Immigration Vote and Possible House Debate on Immigration/Guestworker Legislation

On February 15, the U.S. Senate rejected four immigration proposals, none of which garnered the 60 votes needed to pass in the chamber. The result of the brief voting session, which occurred more than five months after President Trump’s rescission of the DACA program, means that there is still no solution or clear path forward for Dreamers. The Senate’s failure to help Dreamers came after strong opposition to the bipartisan amendments from President Trump and his Administration as well as a veto threat.  President Trump continues to hold the Dreamer youth hostage to his anti-immigrant agenda.

The “USA Act,” Senate Amendment (SA) 1955, introduced by Senators McCain and Coons, which provided a narrow compromise of a clean DREAM Act coupled with border security, received 52 votes in favor and 47 against. (There is a total of 100 Senators, but Senator McCain was absent due to health reasons, so only 99 votes were cast.) The second amendment, SA 1948, an anti-sanctuary cities amendment from Senator Toomey which did not address the DACA issue, received 54 votes in favor and 45 against. The “Immigration Security and Opportunity Act,” SA 1958, introduced by Senators Rounds and King, and championed by moderates in both parties, similarly received 54 votes in favor and 45 against. The fourth and last amendment, Senator Grassley’s “Secure and Succeed Act,” SA 1959, which encompassed the “four pillar” immigration framework recently proposed by President Trump, received the least support of all the proposals, with 39 votes in favor and 60 votes against. That rejection of the President’s racist and anti-immigrant framework principles was thus the only idea to receive 60 votes.  Information on how your Senators voted on each of the amendments can be found here. At the beginning of the week, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell stated that the Senate consideration of the issue of immigration would not extend beyond this week, so the path forward on immigration in the Senate remains unclear.

Meanwhile, the House is currently considering its own potential votes on immigration proposals. One of the bills that could be brought to the floor is Rep. Goodlatte’s “Securing America’s Future Act,” even though it still does not have enough votes to pass in the House and would almost certainly be rejected in the Senate given that it is even more anti-immigrant than the Grassley proposal. One of the provisions of Rep. Goodlatte’s bill is the Agricultural Guestworker Act (AGA), the anti-immigrant, anti-labor bill he first introduced in October 2017. Some changes have been made to the AGA in an attempt to win over more agribusiness support.

Congress will be in recess next week, which means that even if immigration were taken up again it would not happen until at least late February. The DACA program is set to formally expire on March 5. During recess, some members of Congress will be holding town halls and other events in their local offices. Supporters of the Dreamers will be taking this opportunity to remind elected representatives that the majority of Americans support a pathway to citizenship for Dreamers and ask them what they will be doing to achieve that goal.

 

February 21, 2018

Farmworker Justice Update on Senate Immigration Deliberation - 02/15/18

The Senate is currently debating immigration policy proposals to address President Trump’s termination of DACA, which has put Dreamers, some of whom are the children of farmworkers, in limbo and in jeopardy of deportation. Given the urgency of providing a permanent solution for Dreamers, the Senate should focus on a clean DREAM Act. However, the Senate has chosen to undergo an open amendment process and members of Congress have filed a number of amendments on other immigration issues, including border security, family migration and sanctuary cities, among many others.

As of the time of this update, the Senate is reportedly moving forward with votes on four amendments. Two of the proposals are bi-partisan: the “USA Act” introduced by Senators McCain and Coons and the “Immigration Security and Opportunity Act” introduced by Senators Rounds and King. Republican-sponsored amendments include an anti-sanctuary cities amendment from Senator Toomey and Senator Grassley’s “Secure and Succeed Act,” which encompasses the “four pillar” immigration framework recently proposed by President Trump. There is widespread opposition from immigration and labor groups to both Senator Grassley’s and Senator Toomey’s amendments. Many immigration advocates support the McCain-Coons proposal, but the recently introduced Rounds-King amendment has garnered opposition from many immigration advocacy groups, as it provides large amounts of funding for border security, including a border wall, and places restrictions on family migration. Votes on each of the amendments could take place as early as 2:30 p.m. (ET) this afternoon.  You can watch a live feed of the Senate debate here.

Among the many amendments filed, Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY) submitted a proposed amendment to make harmful changes to the H-2A temporary agricultural worker visa program. Farmworker Justice will continue to monitor the Senate debate as it unfolds, but at this time it appears this amendment will not move forward. The amendment would expand the H-2A program to year-round employment for equine and livestock workers; expand the visa length to 3 years; remove the housing guarantee by allowing employers to substitute a housing voucher for actual housing; expand the ability of employers to apply for H-2A workers jointly without ensuring proper protections for workers; and would reduce recruitment protections for U.S. workers by circumventing the labor market test and reducing government oversight for repeat applications and workers. Senator Paul claims his amendment would streamline the H-2A application process but it does nothing to help farmworkers and in fact would make the situation worse for farmworkers.  Undocumented farmworkers and future farmworkers should be given a path to immigration status, which this amendment does not do.

Of course, despite what happens in the Senate, the House would need to take action before the President considers whether to sign or veto any legislation. There also continues to be pressure from conservative House Republicans to move Rep. Goodlatte’s hard-line anti-immigrant and anti-worker legislation, the “Securing America’s Future Act,” which includes his draconian H-2C guestworker proposal.

Congress should reject any attempts to expand abusive guestworker programs like the H-2A agricultural worker visa program or reduce the limited protections in the program. Congress should also reject the White House’s “four pillar” immigration framework of cuts to family-based immigration and other legal immigration and massive spending on a border wall. The Senate should instead focus its attention on a narrow bipartisan solution that pairs the DREAM Act with effective, smart border security measures.

Farmworker Justice stands with Dreamers.

 

February 09, 2018

Farmworker Justice Update: 02/07/18

H-2A Farmworkers File Lawsuit on Abusive Labor Practices on Blueberry Farm

On January 25, 2018, Columbia Legal Services, in conjunction with law firm Schroeter Goldmark & Bender, filed a class action lawsuit on behalf of H-2A farmworkers against Sarbanand Farms, its parent company Munger Bros., and labor contractor CSI Visa Processing. Munger is the largest producer of fresh blueberries in the world, with more than 3,000 acres in Washington, Oregon, California, British Columbia and Mexico. The lawsuit alleges that the H-2A farmworkers, who worked on Sarbanand Farms in Sumas, Washington, were subject to intimidation, threats and labor violations, and were retaliated against after they went on strike. As described in a recent Mother Jones article, the workers were told to keep picking unless they were on their death bed. Tragically, one of the farmworkers, Honesto Silva, died in August 2017 after complications from diabetes, which some workers believed may have been exacerbated by the working conditions. Sarbanand Farms currently faces nearly $150,000 in fines from the Washington State Department of Labor related to late or missed employee breaks and meal periods. Over 600 farmworkers could potentially be members of the class action.

Congress Reportedly Considering Budget Agreement without Solution for DACA

Congress is facing yet another self-imposed deadline as the current short-term budget resolution is set to expire on February 8. The Senate has reportedly reached a compromise on a two-year budget agreement which would increase budget caps, military spending and disaster aid. It would also extend funding for community health centers for two years and the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) for an additional four years. However, the deal does not provide a solution for immigrant youth, and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) has stated that she will not vote for the agreement unless she is guaranteed a vote on immigration legislation in the House.

Senator Lindsey Graham (R-SC) had earlier mentioned the possibility of provisionally extending DREAMers’ status for a one-year period.  Although the official end date for the DACA program is March 5, 2018, many DACA recipients have already lost their status. The White House stated on February 6 that it will not extend the March 5 deadline. Pursuant to a court decision earlier this year, DACA recipients are currently able to apply to renew their status; however litigation in the case is ongoing. Earlier this week, Senators John McCain (R-AZ) and Chris Coons (D-DE) introduced the “Uniting and Securing America (USA) Act” a bi-partisan immigration proposal that is the companion to a bill previously introduced by Representatives Hurd (R-TX) and Aguilar (D-CA) in the House. The bill is relatively narrow in scope and provides a pathway to citizenship for DREAMers while at the same time increasing border security.

Congress should focus now on a bill that provides a real solution for DREAMers.  It should reject the nativist policy wish list that President Trump insists should be combined with any DACA bill.

Human Cost of Deporting Undocumented Farmworkers Affects a Federal Judge

Macario Gilberto Reyes-Herrera is a farmworker with three children who has worked New York’s farms for almost 27 years.  Like many farmworkers, he is undocumented.  He has been detained and charged with violating our immigration laws, to which he plead guilty.  The federal district court judge in Rochester, Charles Siragusa, reportedly “praised Reyes-Herrera for living the ‘American Dream’ and then added, ‘I hope, by some miracle, you can be allowed to stay.’”  This is just one of thousands of stories that demonstrate the need for immigration reform that recognizes the contributions of farmworkers, the legitimate needs of farmers, and the benefits of immigrants to the nation.

ICE Issues Directive Regarding Immigration Enforcement in Courthouses

On January 31, 2018, Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) published a directive formalizing its policies for enforcement activities in courthouses. The directive lays out ICE’s internal guidelines for this type of enforcement, which many immigration activists have noted to be on the rise in the past year. The directive was announced amidst complaints from legal practitioners and advocates that increased immigration enforcement has led some immigrants to forgo pursuing civil and criminal cases, including serving as witnesses. It states that immigration agents should try to avoid enforcement actions in public areas of the courthouse, as well as in non-criminal courtrooms. It also establishes that family members and friends accompanying a targeted individual and those serving as witnesses should not be targeted absent special circumstances. In related FAQs, ICE reiterated its policy of avoiding enforcement actions at sensitive locations, which does not include courthouses but does include schools, hospitals and places of worship, while at the same time noting that there are exceptions to this policy for border areas. For more information on ICE’s courthouse policy, please see the full document and/or “Frequently Asked Questions.”

Update on Farmworker Health and Safety

Young Children Suffer Severe Injuries from Farm Work   

A recent New York Times article highlights the dangerous and sometimes fatal working conditions faced by children on small family farms. Thousands of children and teenagers are injured and approximately 100 are killed each year while doing farm work. However, the number of injuries and fatalities is likely higher, as there are few standards on how to report such incidents. Some small farm owners say that financial pressures lead them to utilize young family members in lieu of hiring paid employees, while many say that growing up working on a farm is a part of rural life and teaches children valuable lessons. There are questions about the appropriateness of certain tasks for children, however, as some of these deaths resulted from very young children operating heavy motorized equipment.  The agricultural sector has few child labor protections, particularly when it comes to children employed on their own family’s farm.

Sexual Harassment on Farms Is an Epidemic

A recent Atlantic article weaves together diverse stories and studies regarding sexual harassment against farmworker women. As detailed in the article, workers on temporary visas controlled by their employers and those without immigration documents are extremely vulnerable to exploitation. Low-wage workers, who are disproportionally women of color, are extremely susceptible to harassment, but this harassment often receives less attention. In many cases, the harassment is followed by retaliation if the worker rejects the sexual advances or tries to report the abuse.

Farmworker Justice to Honor Leading Advocates for Women

The Farmworker Justice Los Angeles Award Reception on March 20 will include honors for Suguet Lopez and Olga Talamante.  Ms. Lopez is Executive Director of Lideres Campesinas de California (Farmworker Women Leaders of California) and is Secretary of the Board of Alianza Nacional de Campesinas (National Alliance of Farmworker Women).  She will receive our Dolores Huerta award.  Ms. Talamante served for many years as the Executive Director of the Chicana/Latina Foundation in California and was a farmworker as a child who worked the fields in Gilroy, California with her parents who brought her from Mexico.  Information about the event and opportunities to cosponsor and purchase tickets is available on our website special events page.

Immigration

Quick access to our dual-language resources about immigration enforcement specifically for farmworkers. Resources include preparedness checklists, FAQs about raids, and Know Your Rights Toolkits.

Immigration is a critically important issue for farmworkers. Learn about current legislation proposals impacting farmworkers.

Learn about the history of guestworker programs, H-2A program for temporary agricultural work, and the H-2B visa program.