Pesticides

Friday, 16 December 2016

Latino Leaders Oppose the Confirmation of E. Scott Pruitt to the Position of Administrator of the EPA

WASHINGTON, D.C. - The National Hispanic Leadership Agenda, a coalition of 40 of the nation’s preeminent Latino advocacy organizations, unanimously adopted a motion, presented by the Hispanic Federation, opposing the nomination of Oklahoma Attorney General E. Scott Pruitt as Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), citing his long record working to undermine the environmental protections and enforcement entrusted to this vital agency.

The mission of the EPA and its administrator is to protect public health and safeguard our environment. However, over the past five years, Oklahoma Attorney General Pruitt has used his position to repeatedly attack crucial clean air and clean water protections to the detriment of the health and well-being of millions of Americans.

As Latino leaders we have cause to be particularly troubled by this choice. Asthma and other respiratory diseases are more prevalent in Latinos living in inner cities near polluting power plants, truck routes, and factories. Latinos also make up a disproportionately large number of the workers in agricultural field occupations, where they are exposed to health hazards, bad air quality, and economic impacts of extreme weather. Meanwhile Latino children are more likely to die from asthma than non-Latino white children, and many states that are home to the country’s largest Latino communities are ground zero for the impacts of climate change, including extreme heat, drought, and sea level rise.

“Our communities strongly support efforts to reduce air, water, and climate pollution, and we support policies that cre ate good paying clean energy jobs,” said Hispanic Federation President, José Calderón. “With millions of Americans negatively impacted by air pollution, water pollution, and climate change, we simply can’t afford to have an administrator who doesn’t believe in the value of protecting our environment,” continued Calderón.

“EPA plays an important role in protecting agricultural workers and their families from exposure to pesticides and other toxins. We need an EPA administrator who will work hard to protect the health of the agricultural communities that are a vital part of the social and economic fabric of American rural communities,” said Bruce Goldstein, President of Farmworker Justice.

Nine in 10 Latinos want action on climate, while 97 percent of Latino voters agree we have a moral obligation to take care of our environment. We now look to the Senate to ensure that the next leader of EPA is someone one who will advance environmental and health protections for Latinos and for all Americans.

Farmworker Justice’s Statement on EPA’s Certification of Pesticide Applicators Rule

Farmworker Justice is pleased that the EPA has published important changes to regulations that govern the certification, training and supervision of individuals who apply high-risk pesticides. The Certification of Pesticide Applicators rule (40 CFR 171), which has not been updated in nearly 40 years, provides national competency standards for those who may purchase and apply ‘restricted use pesticides’ (RUPs). A pesticide is classified as restricted if it poses heightened risk to people or the environment.

The new rule imposes stricter standards to protect human health and the environment and reduce risk to those applying pesticides. Currently there is wide variance among state certification and training programs for pesticide applicators, and requirements for supervision of non-certified applicators. We are hopeful that the new national standards will provide greater consistency in the knowledge and competency of applicators across the nation. In addition, those who apply pesticides aerially or by fumigation will have to demonstrate competency to use these application methods which pose high risk to applicators, farmworkers and surrounding communities.

Many farmworkers applying RUPs are non-English speaking, non-certified applicators who are applying these chemicals “under the supervision” of certified applicators. These are the applicators that are the most vulnerable to occupational injury from pesticide exposure. The vast majority are unable to read the application instructions and safety information printed on the pesticide labels, which are almost entirely in English. Although we are disappointed that the EPA does not require pesticide labels to have bilingual content, the revised rule requires supervisors to provide to non-certified applicators the label information about safety precautions and detailed use instructions in a manner and language that the non-certified applicator can understand. The revised rule also includes improved standards for supervision, establishes a minimum age of 18 for applicators, and requires non-certified applicators to receive pesticide handler and safety training in a language they understand.

We hope that the improved regulation will result in greater awareness by pesticide applicators of the risks they face, stronger protections from exposure, and ultimately, fewer pesticide-related injuries, illnesses, and deaths among farmworkers and their family members.

by Jessica Felix-Romero
(0 total comments)
Tuesday, 31 March 2015

EPA proposed changes to the WPS last year, and before the public comment period closed in August, hundreds of thousands of individuals urged EPA to do more to protect workers and their families. Today again, we calling on EPA to finalize the WPS by August 18th, one year from the end of that comment period. We will deliver a petition to the EPA later today with more than 21,000 signatures from individuals around the country asking the Agency to act swiftly to prevent further injury to workers from pesticides.

The U.S. EPA’s Worker Protection Standard (WPS) provides basic protections for farmworkers from exposure to pesticides. In 1992, when EPA last updated the WPS, it estimated that farmworkers in this country experienced between 10,000 and 20,000 physician-diagnosed pesticide poisonings annually. While the 1992 revisions led to some improvement in working conditions, the WPS stills fall woefully short of truly protecting workers. In the more than 20 years since those revisions were implemented, further research on the dangers of pesticides and its effect on workers’ health underscore the urgency in strengthening these protections. 

Twenty years is too long to wait. Every growing season that change is delayed results in thousands of preventable exposures to workers and their families.
 

Follow our facebook page for updates from petition delivery event.
 

by Jessica Felix-Romero
(0 total comments)
Monday, 18 August 2014

Today is the last day that the EPA will accept public comments on proposed revisions to the Worker Protection Standard (WPS) that provides the regulatory minimum for occupational pesticide exposure protection. Other workers who are exposed to toxic substances are covered by stronger protections, issued by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). The result is that the men, women, and children who produce the nation’s food are less protected from workplace hazards than other workers.

Although the proposed changes to the WPS will not address all the challenges in the fields, they are a step in the right direction to prevent pesticide illness. If the final rule includes our recommended improvements, the results will include greater awareness by farmworkers of the risks they face and preventative measures; and fewer pesticide-related injuries, illnesses, and deaths among farmworkers and their family members.

The agricultural industry is working hard to dissuade the EPA from adopting the rules that benefit farmworkers the most. Today, Politico reported the National Association of State Departments of Agriculture submitted comments that “call on the EPA to scrap the proposed changes.”

Farmworker Justice and other farmworker advocates have provided the EPA with extensive information to justify stronger protections for farmworkers. Your voice is needed to make sure farmworker safety does not take a back seat to the interests of agribusiness and pesticide manufacturers.

Please join Farmworker Justice and urge the EPA to protect farmworkers from pesticide exposure. You have until midnight tonight to submit comments.

Visit our website to use our model comments and submit by midnight tonight!
 

by Jessica Felix-Romero
(0 total comments)
Subscribe to Pesticides